Map

This map shows all of the Avenues of Honour we have located across Australia- more than 580. By exploring the map and clicking on individual markers you can find out more about each Avenue.  (Please note the map may take some time to load on slower Internet connections).

Please let us know if you can provide any additional information about an Avenue.  We look forward to hearing from you.  You can make a comment below the map or send us an email.

 

29 thoughts on “Map

  1. L Harris

    This a terrific project! A note: the Avenue of Honour on Warburton Highway Wandin North actually starts at Union Road next to the Wandin North shops and continues along Warburton Highway to the roundabout – Clegg Road intersection. On the map Google map on the AoH website it suggests that the Avenue Of Honour is at Picnic Hill Reserve on Warburton Highway, near Boundary Road which ia around 1.5 kilometres away from the actual planting. This AoH is beautiful – all WA Red Flowering Gum, Corymbia (syn. Eucalypt) ficifolia in a range of flower colours.

    Reply
    1. editor

      Thankyou for your interest in the Avenues Project and your additional information. We are relying on local knowledge such as yours to identify any errors in our database and to add new information. We will update the location as soon as possible and would love to hear from you if you have any more information on this, or any other, avenue.

      Reply
  2. Frank Golding

    This is an awesome concept. I admire your courage in taking it on. I realise the scope of the project is already enormous, but what would be a great bonus would be to encourage people at local level to send you a list of the names (where they are available) of the soldiers who are commemorated at each Avenue of Honour. I’m not aware of any other project that captures that data. It would be a fabulous resource for families and researchers. Is this a feasible idea – or am I mad?

    Reply
    1. editor

      That is exactly the kind of detail we will want to include when the full wiki website is developed. Unfortunately the development of that resource is limited by available funding at the moment but the team is determined that it will happen. Currently we are delighted to include any information the public can provide into the database we are building including individual commemoration details.
      If you are mad then we are too! You are correct that it would be a great resource – and in time with help from people like you it will be.
      Regards, The AoH Team

      Reply
    2. John Huth

      I am currently getting this information (names etc etc) together for all the avenues in Queensland

      Reply
  3. Monica Hayes

    Hi
    Great project. I have a story that I was told as a child about the Avenue of Honour at Woodend along the old Calder Highway. I don’t know whether it is true or not but it might be of interest. The avenue has a section part way along where there are no trees on one side. I asked my father (whose family has a long history in the area) why there were no trees. He told me that the farmer that owned the property in that section would not let his workers have the half day off on the day that the tree plantings were taking place. So, the community responded by refusing to plant trees along his section of road.

    Reply
    1. editor

      Thank you very much for the story. It is the little details like this about the avenues that really brings the history alive. It sounds like it should be true and we will include it in the database although unless we find another source we will probably have to report it as unconfirmed.
      Regards, The AoH Team

      Reply
  4. Stephen

    Congratulations on this fantastic site. We live near the Kingston Avenue of Honour which is a wonderful example of this extraordinary form of tribute. We will continue to follow with interest.

    Reply
    1. editor

      Thank you for your interest. If you have any photos or more information about your local avenue at Kingston we would love to add them to our database.
      Regards, The AoH Team

      Reply
  5. Ian Sullivan

    I was very interested to see the article on Avenues of Honour in this Saturday’s “The Age” (8th June).

    This led me to the website and the maps where I learn that Woodend, Vic has three such avenues. However the main avenue – located in the road named Avenue of Honour and mentioned in The Age article is not shown on the map. Does Woodend actually have four avenues or is one of the others wrongly placed?

    Ian Sullivan

    Reply
    1. editor

      Thank you for your interest and your observation. We are only aware of three avenues in Woodend so we will look into the database and correct the map. Given the nature of the data collection for the map we expected some errors and are relying on locals such as yourself to update our information.
      Regards, The AoH Team

      Reply
  6. Greg McHenry

    My Great Uncle, Robert John McHenry has a tree in the Kingston Avenue of Honour. Robert McHenry grew up in the local area and worked as baker in Newlyn before leaving for Gallipoli in 1915. After the evacuation of Gallipoli he was sent to the Western Front where he was killed in Poziers on the 28th July 1916.
    My wife & I have visited the beautiful Kingston Avenue of Honour a number of times in the last 10 years, as I am on a journey to discover more about my family history.

    Reply
    1. editor

      Hi Greg,
      All the best with your journey into the past.
      Finding the tree for your Great Uncle R J McHenry must have been a special occasion.
      Do you have a photo of the tree and a little more you can share about Robert with all of us?

      Reply
  7. Geoff Nevill

    Great Project! I have some info on the Maldon Avenue of Honour which predates the main Ballarat one.
    I grew up at the foot of Anzac Hill in Maldon, and about 15 years ago I did a Conservation Analysis of the Maldon Avenue as part of some further study I was undertaking at the time. You are welcome to a copy of it, if it would be of use. Unfortunately the electronic version was on floppy disk, and is long gone, but I could scan the original if you are interested.

    Geoff Nevill

    Reply
    1. editor

      Hi Geoff,
      Glad you like the project.
      Obviously you have long term passion for Avenues of Honour and we would love to receive a scanned copy of your original conservation analysis.
      Eventually you and others will have the means via a wiki based data tool to upload all your knowledge regarding local avenues directly to our website. Your work from 1998 will form part of the Maldon Avenue page.

      Reply
  8. Marlene Greiner

    Hello and thanks for undertaking this wonderful, and huge, project!
    I am currently researching a WW1 avenue in Hamilton, Victoria. It was planted in Clarke Street to commemorate the large amount of men who enlisted from this street (so not all were KIA) in 1918. The trees planted, Sycamores, generally did not thrive, (the last few made it into the 1980′s), and were replaced by flowering plums. These plums are now at the end of their life. A street meeting was held recently with a council representative and it was decided to replant with flowering pears. As such the avenue of honour will be renewed.
    It is claimed that Clarke Street had the largest ratio of men to houses in a street to enlist, (the street is only two blocks long). This may not be strictly true. As my research continues I hope to produce a booklet about the Clarke Street Avenue of Honour and the soldiers who it commemorates.

    Marlene Greiner

    Reply
    1. editor

      Hi Marlene,
      Thanks for your kind words of support. You and other members of the Hamilton community should be justly proud of your endeavours. There are similar WW1 stories of the relative number of individuals, particularly from small rural towns, that not only enlisted but failed to return – such an impact.
      Congratulations to all involved in the work in ensuring the preservation of the Clarke Street Avenue of Honour. We wish you every success with your research Marlene and compiling the associated stories. We’d love to have an update about the status of the booklet.
      Regards,
      The AoH Team

      Reply
  9. Sandy & Brian Morris

    We have just been forwarded the link to this website as we now live at Tannymorel in Qld which has an avenue of honour. Some of the trees at the front of our house have the plaques on them but over time the bark has grown over them and others have obviously fallen off and been lost. We have photos of the ones that you can see the outline of the overgrown plaque and one where the plaque still protrudes a little from the bark. We are really keen on finding out how to get more info on them and possibly adopting trees to have the plaques redone. I’m not sure what the actual trees are but in the summer months they look absolutely beautiful in full leaf.

    Reply
  10. Kay Paton

    The Yendon Avenue of Honour has now been restored. The Yendon History Group located the State School’s Roll of Honour book, which contained the names of 44 ex-students who had served in WW1, and 14 of these were marked as ‘Killed in Action’ or ‘Deceased’. Through 2012-13 we undertook much research, and discovered 12 more servicemen who had spent part of their lives in Yendon without attending the school, and 2 of these also were killed.
    Moorabool Council provided us with 7 new oak trees to fill in the gaps between the 9 mature trees that have been there forever, and on 27th April 2014, we had a marvelous Dedication Day. Families of many of the 60 servicemen come to unveil the 16 plaques and see our new Honour Board in the Avenue, which were all purchased through the Anzac Centenary Local Grants Program. A Memorial Book has also been printed, giving an updated story for each of the men, and this is available in local libraries, and for purchase.

    Reply
  11. Jason Turton

    Soldiers Avenue in Freshwater is the last remaining, fully intact, Avenue of Honour in the Sydney Metro Area and is undergoing a revival in preparation for the 2015 ANZAC Centenary. The Friends Of Freshwater are representing the local community in this endeavor. The first trees were dedicated around 1932. We have completed an arboreal survey of all of the trees in the Avenue as part of our attempt to seek Historical Significance classification for them. We are working with AUSGRID to have high-voltage power lines bundled or under-grounded so that the trees can recover from their heavily-lopped shapes. We are also collating and re-commemorating all of the original plaques and plinths from the Avenue and adding plaques for previously unrecognized local residents who served in WWI and WWII, with new plinths around the Heroes Tree and the Freshwater Surf Life Saving Club Tree as well as a new RSL Tree, with plinth, to be planted and dedicated in April 2015. The plaques will include QR codes which link to a website with detailed information about the individuals and the history of the local area and we are currently in the process of gathering as much information, both official and private as we can for this project. We have located Honour Boards in all of the local schools, churches and sporting clubs as well as council, government and Australian War Memorial records to gather as many names as possible. Our aim is to have the Avenue included as a “Link Walk” in the Manly to Palm Beach walking trail and as a resource for schools to visit. We commend you on your huge project and offer our help with any resources you would like from our group and it’s records.

    Reply
  12. Karen

    What a great initiative! Congratulations on putting this together.
    I live in Graceville Queensland, and one of the major streets through our leafy suburb is called Honour Avenue. It is lined with natives on one side and Laurel trees on the other. Given its name, I had always presumed it was established as an ‘avenue of honour’ but I can’t find it mentioned here, nor in the document by Brisbane City Council. Graceville Memorial Park is adjacent – just over the railway line, and I see the plantings there are mentioned (53 pines). Weinholt Street is also mentioned – and it runs off Honour Avenue. Does anyone know the history?

    Reply
  13. Bob

    David,
    I haven’t been able to find any mention in the Treenet listing of the Buninyong WW1 Avenue of Honour ( Buninyong is a township of 3000 + about 15 km south of Ballarat in Vic. on the Midland Hwy ).
    It’s perhaps not surprising, because the Avenue has been sadly neglected over many years and in some sections is barely recognisable due to encroaching native trees and scrub. Nevertheless, about 100 trees of the original 150 planted on Arbor Day June 1917 remain. The Avenue goes though the centre of Buninyong along Learmonth Street from the Country Fire Aurthority ( CFA ) to the Golf Course.
    As evidence of the original planting, the following is an extract of the 4 July 1917 issue of the “Ballarat Courier” under the heading ” Buninyong Avenue of Honor “:

    ” On Saturday afternoon 150 trees were planted in honor of the lads who have gone to the front. The citizens turned out in full force and the trees were set and guarded within the space of three hours. Mothers, fathers, brothers and sisters, as well as friends of the boys assisted. The President of the Shire —————-, etc. Rich and poor mingled in an endeavour to give the lads a fitting memorial” .

    Buninyong RSL Sub-Branch, assisted by local community groups and the Ballarat Council, is currently undertaking restoration of the Avenue, completion of which is timed for the Centenary of it’s planting in mid-2017. The restoration includes clearing out intruding trees / scrub and planting new trees to accommodate 164 memorial plaques naming local men who were either KIA, DOW, or DOD. ( None of the original tin plaques nailed to the trees survive, so all the new plaques will be cast bronze mounted on concrete plinths ).
    I’ve recently advised the relevant DVA website ( which states that the Avenue was planted in 1920, with only six trees remaining ) of the facts.
    Could appropriate information on the Buninyong WW1 Avenue of Honour be included in your listing please ??

    Regards,

    Robert C. Bennett AM
    Secretary
    Buninyong RSL Sub -Branch

    Reply
    1. editor

      Hello Bob,
      Thanks for your encouraging and detailed update about the Buninyong WW1 Avenue of Honour.
      Our records do have a listing for Buninyong – though clearly the data was not entirely accurate. The Buninyong AoH details have now been amended accordingly!
      What is particularly inspiring has been the initiative of the Buninyong RSL Sub-branch and the partnership with the City of Ballarat and the local community to embark on this restoration project.
      It represents the type of sentiment and people power that helped establish the original commemorative plantings back in 1917 – a legacy being embraced by the current generation and for many generations to come.
      We look forward to more updates as the project progresses and would be pleased to receive any images you could supply to add to our Flickr pages images record.
      Well done.
      All the best,
      The AoH Team

      Reply
  14. Laele pepper

    Your map is an excellent idea but Victoria is way too crowded. It is not possible to enlarge the map nor click on smaller towns. Do you have any solutions for a crowdd state?
    L.Pepper

    Reply
    1. editor

      Hi Laele,
      Thanks for the prompt. Apologies if the Map window does not appear as intuitive as it ought.
      On the top-right of the small map panel is a four-cornered ‘box’. Clicking on that ‘box’ will enlarge the map and provide convenient access to the otherwise ‘crowded’ cluster of map-pins.
      Having enlarged the map, a column depicting a list of avenues will appear on the left of screen. Clicking on the small down-arrow next to the “All items” pin will reveal this list.
      It is also possible to enlarge the area you seek by ‘dragging’ the map-image to your preferred region – and further enlarge by clicking on the + or – buttons on the bottom-left of the map.
      Please have a play and let us know how you get on.
      All the best,
      The AoH Team

      Reply
    1. editor

      Hello Ann,
      Thanks for taking the time to inform the Avenues of Honour Project. We’re delighted to add Inverell’s Kurrajong Parade to the growing record of commemorative avenues around Australia. The dedicated Inverell Remembers website is simply stunning and an absolute credit to the local community organisations, historians, researchers, families and relatives who have contributed so much to the story of the Kuurajongs volunteers.
      Thanks for your over-the-phone guidance as I roamed Google Maps and helping me to locate the most favourable coordinates for mapping the location of the commemorative trees.
      Best wishes,
      Glenn Williams
      (on behalf of the the AoH Team).

      Reply
  15. John Selwood

    I am a member (No. 79) of the Wyong Family History Group Inc. In 2016 our group commemorated the centenary of the naming of ANZAC Ave Wyong and ANZAC Ave (now Rd) at Tuggerah. When these streets were named they also had tree plantings on the same day.

    ANZAC Ave Wyong – trees planted on 12th August 1916 – none remain
    Species planted were 70 Brush Box trees with Wattles planted on each corner
    Commemorated with a brass plaque.

    ANZAC Rd Tuggerah – trees planted 26th August 1916 – none remain
    Species planted were 24 camphor laurel, white oak, flowering wattle, eucalyptus and silky oak. A total of 38 trees were planted.
    Commemorated with a brass plaque.

    Note: Plaques funded by way of a grant from the Federal Government’s Centenary of ANZAC grants.

    Reply
    1. editor

      Hello John,
      Thanks very much to you and members of the Wyong Family History Group Inc. Delighted the group and your local community were able to celebrate the centenary of your two ANZAC Avenues and to acknowledge the original commemorative plantings. Sad the trees in both sites have all gone, but well done to your group for arranging for commemorative plaques so that this piece of our history can be remembered.
      The detail you’ve provided is most welcome.
      Are you able to send any images of the sites and their plaques? Do you have copies of newspaper articles and the like that our project might be able to have as well?
      Email admin@avenuesofhonour.org
      Best wishes,
      The AoH Team.

      Reply

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